Truck driver gets on his bike for MS Society

Mark and colleagues get behind the MS cause. SUS-150317-110100001
Mark and colleagues get behind the MS cause. SUS-150317-110100001

Seaford truck driver Marc Ansell is swapping his lorry for two wheels and cycling from London to Paris to raise money for the MS Society.

Marc, who lives in Seaford, will be taking on the 300 mile challenge in July.

The MS Society provides truly valuable help, emotional support and guidance in so many different ways.  They are fantastic and I want to do my bit to say a big thank you.

Marc Ansell

Although he is not an experienced cyclist, he is building up his training for the event.

Marc has a personal connection with multiple sclerosis as his mother, who lives in Kent, has the condition.

He said, “MS is an awful neurological condition that affects approximately 100,000 people in the UK including my mum. The condition affects people in different ways and once identified, can be really difficult to comprehend and deal with day to day. The MS Society provides truly valuable help, emotional support and guidance in so many different ways.  They are fantastic and I want to do my bit to say a big thank you.”

Marc, 26, who is married to Chloe and has two daughters and a son, works for haulier Dobbs Logistics in Hailsham.  

Dobbs’ operations director Stephen Morgan said, “What Marc is doing for his mum and the MS Society is amazing and as a company we are right behind him. My sister-in-law suffers with the condition too and I am sure most families out there have someone who has been diagnosed with MS.

“We all get asked to support charities a lot these days, but if you are able, I urge that you get behind this wonderful gesture and support Marc.”

You can sponsor Marc at www.justgiving.com/marc-ansell.

Marc Ansell will be raising money for the Eastbourne and South Wealden branch of the MS Society.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a condition of the central nervous system.

In MS, the coating around nerve fibres (called myelin) is damaged, causing a range of symptoms.

More than 100,000 people in the UK have MS. Symptoms usually start in your 20s and 30s and it affects almost three times as many women as men.

MS is a lifelong condition but treatments can help manage the condition and its symptoms. For more information about the condition visit the MS Society website at http://www.mssociety.org.uk/