SEAFORD HEAD CLIFF TRAGEDY: CALL FOR HELP

A CORONER has called for more phone boxes and Samaritans signs at Seaford Head cliffs in a bid to stop people from jumping.

Alan Craze spoke out during the inquest into the death of 25-year-old Rebecca Lynes.

Rebecca, who had suffered mental health problems for two years before her death, threw herself from the cliff top on April 5.

Her distraught father Tony said, 'We went to Seaford Head after her death and we did feel there is nothing to prevent anyone deliberately or accidentally going over.'

And Mr Craze added, 'I have often thought there would be a great opportunity to put up notices with the number of the Samaritans together with some phone boxes.

'Numbers of suicides in the New Forest dropped when such notices were put up.'

Rebecca, who worked as a hotel receptionist in Camberwell, was found dead at the bottom of the cliffs.

She had started suffering from psychological problems after using cannabis and magic mushrooms while in India.

Dr Jane Tiller, her psychiatrist, said Rebecca had had 'delusional beliefs' and showed signs of schizophrenia.

She had been sectioned in 2001 and taken an overdose of paracetamol months later.

She had been getting help from the home treatment team in the months before her death and her parents had asked the team for her daily medication in advance so she could make a trip to Brighton.

Rebecca decided to leave to stay with a friend before the pills arrived - and the next day she was found dead at Seaford Head.

'She was a spasmodic taker of medication,' her father Tony told the inquest.

'We did not have any reason to think she would kill herself in the way she eventually did.

'She had left a suicide note on a previous occasion when she had gone to Brighton. Arguably with the benefit of hindsight we should have been worried about her going to Brighton again.'

Mr Craze recorded a verdict of suicide.