Bees and other pollinators in Eastbourne will be protected by this new scheme

Bumblebee
Bumblebee

Bees and other pollinators in Eastbourne will be protected as part of new plans to “supercharge” the defence of the town’s biodiversity.

Eastbourne’s Cabinet agreed last night (September 11) to a new strategy which will make the town more friendly for pollinating insects and end the use of harmful pesticides through a “phased reduction”.

Red-tailed bumblebee

Red-tailed bumblebee

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Councillor Jonathan Dow, Cabinet member for the environment, said, “The supercharge has kicked in on our plans for making the town’s environment the thriving habitat that everyone wants to see and enjoy, especially our insects!

“These crucial new frameworks for land management put environmental best practice front and centre and I’m very proud to be part of this vital undertaking.”

The Pollinator Strategy details how the council will maintain, protect and enhance key habitats over the long-term for the many species of insects that pollinate crops and wildflowers including bees, butterflies, moths, flies, beetles and wasps. They are integral to our ecosystems but are under threat.

People will also be encouraged to cultivate their own pollinator-friendly spaces.

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The council said the Pesticide Policy reinforces the council’s commitment to avoiding pesticides whenever possible on its sites including parks, recreation grounds, sports fields, downland, cemeteries and nature reserves. Children’s play areas are already pesticide-free.

Cllr Dow said, “We will make every effort to steer clear of chemicals. And in any instances where alternative methods are either not currently available or not effective, we will always resolve the problem with as little effect on the environment as possible.”