Baby doves and fox cub saved by wildlife charity

Fox cub at the WRAS SUS-150330-093852001
Fox cub at the WRAS SUS-150330-093852001

Spring is upon us and that means one thing for the East Sussex Wildlife Rescue and Ambulance Service - baby animals.

With Easter just around the corner, WRAS has already taken in numerous baby animals that were too young to survive in the wild.

On Friday night (March 27), a fox cub was rescued at Kingsmere, in Eastbourne, after being found abandoned, hypothermic, and underweight in the middle of a lawn.

WRAS founder Trevor Weeks MBE took the cub in for the night and fed it every three hours through the night with a special puppy milk replacer and rehydration fluids.

Six baby doves have also been taken into the care of the WRAS after being found in Eastbourne, Hailsham, Lewes, East Hoathly and Selmeston.

The young birds have been brought into care for a variety of reasons, including being captured by cats, but all are suffering from calcium deficiency. This, combined with being young and unable to fly, makes them vulnerable to predators.

It’s so nice to have them in again, I’ve really missed them, and they really make you smile at this age. Once they realise you are their new mum, they start to wing waggle and squeak for food.

Kathy Martyn, WRAS volunter

WRAS volunteer and orphaned dove specialist Kathy Martyn has been looking after the six doves to give them round-the-clock care.

She said, “It’s so nice to have them in again, I’ve really missed them, and they really make you smile at this age. Once they realise you are their new mum, they start to wing waggle and squeak for food. When they get a bit older, they will, like most teenagers, start to rebel and they will be grouped together to ensure they become wild.”

WRAS’s orphan team leader Lindsay Redfern, who has also been looking after a young mouse with help of assistant manager Kirsti Sibbald, added, “The babies are very cute but are a lot of hard work and cause you to lose a lot of sleep.

“Although we love having our babies in care, it is important that people don’t touch baby wildlife unnecessarily. We urge people who are concerned about any baby or young wildlife not to touch them unless in immediate danger – like in the middle of road - and to call a rescue organisation for advice.”

It’s not unusual for mothers to leave their young hidden behind bushes or in long grass, as well as to not sleep with their young, especially as they grow and take up more space. Some birds, like young tawny owls, will climb up and down the trunks of their trees, so if found at the base of a tree should be left alone.

To contact the WRAS for advice or to make a donation, visit www.wildlifeambulance.org or call 01825 873003.