New device at Eastbourne DGH to break up kidney stones

Urology staff with the lithotripter along with Simon Mackie and Bob Lewis from the Medi Tech Trust SUS-191021-113125001
Urology staff with the lithotripter along with Simon Mackie and Bob Lewis from the Medi Tech Trust SUS-191021-113125001

A non-invasive device that breaks up kidney stones called a lithotripter has been donated by Medi Tech Trust, a locally based charity, to Eastbourne DGH.

Using shock waves, the lithotripter provides a nonsurgical means of pulverizing kidney stones into minute crystals, small enough to be passed naturally in the patient’s urine. Patents do not require invasive surgery or a general anaesthetic, so they can remain awake during the procedure and return home the same day.

Consultant urologist Simon Mackie said, “We are delighted the Medi Tech Trust has donated this ‘state of the art’ lithotripter to Eastbourne DGH.

“The urology department at Eastbourne has undergone a transformation over recent years so we now offer a top quality service for urology patients in East Sussex.

“There have been a number of recent developments including robotic surgery, refurbished ward facilities and the brand new Urology Investigation Suite. This latest addition will improve services further as kidney stones affect around one in 10 people and represent a large proportion of emergency admissions to our unit.

“Having the lithotripter available on-site means our patients can now be offered the full range of treatment options as and when required.”

Medi Tech Trust founding trustee Bob Lewis said, “My locally based charity Medi Tech Trust spent a year raising funds towards buying a £265,000 lithotripter to be donated to coincide with the opening of the new Urology Investigation Suite unit.

“Grateful thanks go to those local businesses, organisations and individuals whose generosity helped this goal to be achieved. “

Over the past 17 years, Medi Tech Trust has donated more than£1 million worth of medical equipment to Sussex hospitals and doctors’ surgeries, with the lion’s share finding a home at Eastbourne DGH.