Wasteland blossoms into community garden

Local residents joined councillors Jim Murray and Steve Wallis, along with members of the Transition Town Eastbourne, to turn some wasteland between Dursley Road and Winchcombe Road into a new community garden.
Local residents joined councillors Jim Murray and Steve Wallis, along with members of the Transition Town Eastbourne, to turn some wasteland between Dursley Road and Winchcombe Road into a new community garden.

Workhas begun on transforming an area of wasteland into a community garden with wild flower meadows, seating and a children’s play area.

Local residents joined councillors Jim Murray and Steve Wallis, along with members of the Transition Town Eastbourne to clear the site between Dursley Road and Winchcombe Road.

The volunteers cleared rubble, glass and litter before laying cardboard and spreading mulch in preparation for the garden to be planted in the autumn and spring.

The garden, for all ages, will also include fruit trees, berry bushes and vegetable plots and has been funded using money from the council’s devolved budget scheme, awarded by Devonshire Ward councillors.

Cllr Wallis said, “It was good to see so many people working together on this exciting project. Once established the area will have been totally transformed and the garden will be in place for future generations to enjoy.

“Eastbourne Borough Council look after many large parks and gardens within the town, but the authority is also keen to help kick start local, smaller projects.”

Sue Moss, whose mother, Rene White, 90, lives close to the garden, said ‘I am delighted that my mother will finally have a beautiful place to sit in the sun.”

The Transition Group is made up of local residents committed to helping people develop more local resilience from growing and distributing our own food to saving water, developing community-run renewable green energy, re-purposing waste and saving the bees. You can find out more about Transition projects and how to get involved on www.eastbournetransition.org