Villagers angry over charge for a second green bin

East Dean and Friston Residents Association led by Chairman Roy Webb (centre front), are protesting about a charge for second green waste bins from Wealden Council. March 26th 2013 E13101P
East Dean and Friston Residents Association led by Chairman Roy Webb (centre front), are protesting about a charge for second green waste bins from Wealden Council. March 26th 2013 E13101P

Villagers in East Dean and Friston are angry after being told they will have to fork out £40 if they wish to have a second bin for green garden waste.

Roy Webb, chairman of the residents’ association in the area, said many homeowners already had a second black bin that they used for rubbish including grass and hedge trimmings, but had been told by Wealden District Council that if villagers continued to use this when the changes come into affect that it would not be collected.

They will now be given a brown bin for the waste but should they wish to fill a second bin then the charge will apply.

Mr Webb, who lives in Windmill, Lane, Friston, contacted the Gazette, saying many of the residents in the area often had two lots of green waste to be disposed of on collection day - which takes place every two weeks - adding, “We have been told that we have to register by March 31 if we want a brown bin for our garden waste and this will come into operation at the end of July.

“But if we want a second bin we have to pay £40 per year. People can’t afford it.

“They want us to provide the garden waste but their charging us £40 a year for a second bin.”

Mr Webb said residents were informed of the cost in a letter sent out in March, adding, “Everybody is really upset.

“Not everyone has access to go to a recycling centres and dispose of waste, this will encourage people to burn garden waste. We’re going to have an increase in unenvironmentally friendly bonfires.”

Mr Webb said the second black bin had been accumulated by some of the residents because the first had been slightly damaged during collection or bin lids lost. He said these had been replaced but homeowners were still able to use the first ones.

He added, “The general consensus in talking to villagers most affected is that it’s a step backwards as far as recycling is concerned. The Garden Club in the area would argue that we should not compost weeds.”

Councillor Rowena Moore, cabinet portfolioholder for Waste Management, said, “We are making savings of £750,000 a year and improving kerbside recycling to include glass and more plastics, and we are still able to offer free green garden waste recycling to all households who have registered for this service.

“I do not think it is unreasonable to ask those households with larger gardens who require the provision of an additional green waste recycling bin to pay £40 a year for the service. There is always the option of composting more of their garden waste.”