School plan go ahead despite residents’ fears over traffic

Residents in Wilkinson Way, Seaford, protesting about new extension of Seaford Primary School complaining that the traffic is bad enough
Residents in Wilkinson Way, Seaford, protesting about new extension of Seaford Primary School complaining that the traffic is bad enough

PLANS for a development at a Seaford school have been given the go-ahead, despite fears that it will spark further traffic chaos in the area.

Residents living near Seaford Primary School in Wilkinson Way said the proposals for two mobile classrooms would create further problems in an already busy, no-through road.

One local said they feared a child could be killed.

Many homeowners who signed a petition complained that they were often stuck in their drives because of children getting dropped off at school.

People parking on pavements and zig zag lines as well as emergency services having problems accessing the road were some of the other problems put forward by residents.

The planning committee at East Sussex County Council (ESCC) backed the application at a recent meeting.

However this is subject to works being carried out on the road which could include double yellow lines at the Wilkinson Way and the Belgrave Road junction.

Temporary permission for eight years was applied for and the plans were put forward because of the predicted increase in demand for reception year spaces in the town over the coming years.

The report added that neighbouring primary schools, Cradle Hill and Chyngton, had recently permanently increased their capacity following a £4 million capital funding investment to replace on-site mobile classrooms with new school buildings and extensions.

The committee agreed to approve the plans subject to a financial contribution being secured for a Traffic Regulation Order.

This to include double yellow lines at the Wilkinson Way and Belgrave Road junction and keep clear markings outside the primary school’s gates or other works to the satisfaction of the Highway Authority.

In March a spokesman for ESCC earlier told the Gazette that they had a duty to make sure there were places available for children at a local school.