OUT IN THE FIELD: Relief as public toilets re-open

The toilets either side of the TIC reopened on Thursday
The toilets either side of the TIC reopened on Thursday

I rarely use public toilets these days but even so I was still surprised at how long the refurbishment work to the lavatories either side of the TIC in Cornfield Road was actually taking. The toilets were shut before Christmas with a sign on both the ladies and gents saying it was a temporary closure. As three months dragged by there was often little evidence that anyone was actually doing any work there at all. But at long last yesterday the doors were finally thrown open and all in time for the Easter holiday visitors.

Eastbourne said farewell to one its lovely quirky characters this week – little Irish Annie, a popular employee in the restaurant in Debenhams in the town centre for more than 35 years. A service was held at Our Lady of Ransom in Grange Road on Tuesday followed by two wakes at her favourite watering holes, the TUC in Seaside and Langley’s, once the Bourne Inn, before she made her journey back to Ireland to her final resting place. RIP Annie. Another colourful vibrant lady passed away last Friday too: Amanda Wilkins, who worked as a reporter on the Herald and still wrote theatre reviews and the odd article. Amanda was also one of those enthusiastic and delightfully bonkers friends that was a force of nature, full of life , loud, gregarious and with a heart of gold for anything to do with charity. She brightened up many a press night at Eastbourne Theatres shows and often more entertaining than what was going onstage. Wilko, you’ll be missed.

As my house moving drama continues unabated and myself and the Little Treasures move from one area of the town to another, Latimer Road is our latest pit stop. I walked up Seaside towards Beckett Towers this week and noticed the sad demolition of the former Lloyd’s Bank, which is steeped in history and was once the Rising Sun Tavern. Let’s hope the block of flats taking its place will fit in with the local area and not be yet another ghastly blot on the landscape.