Are you troubled by your own tardiness?

When blogger Greg Savage asked the question, “How did it get to be ok for people to be late for everything?” he had 350,000 Facebook likes. Seems like he may not be the only one adversely affected by the sloppy timekeeping of others. He believes that technology makes it worse; asking the question “why is it that texting or emailing you are late somehow means you are no longer late”? His answer to that is quite simply ‘rubbish’! If you are being adversely affected by the lateness of others then it may help if you talk about how you feel and how it impacts on you. After all it is the responsibility of the unpunctual person to change their behaviour. Procrastination or being late is deemed to be a way of manipulating and controlling a situation at the expense of others. If the person continues to disrespect your time, then perhaps you need to review the relationship. Regarding lateness in a more empathic way Diane DeLonzor, author of Never Be Late Again, says lateness is a commonly misunderstood problem and has conducted her own research on the perpetually tardy. “Yes, it’s a rude act, but I’ve interviewed hundreds of people and the vast majority of late people really dislike being late, they try to be on time, but this is something that has plagued them throughout their lives. Telling a chronic late person to be on time is like telling a dieter, ‘Don’t eat so much.” Constant lateness can leave you feeling stressed, anxious and brings unnecessary pressure to your life. To enable you to change your behaviour start writing down how long it actually takes you to carry out your daily tasks; late people generally underestimate the passage of time. This will give you a clearer picture of just how long you spend so that you can recalculate future timing. Also, stop overscheduling your day with too much activity and commitments; and learn to say ‘no’ more often! If you would like to find out more about Julia’s counselling see www.juliameanwellcounselling.co.uk she can be contacted by email julia.meanwell@gmail.com or give her a call on 07714 280083.