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Owl suffering from canker

Owl suffering from canker

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My ever suffering partner Kathy missed out on her romantic Valentine’s evening this year thanks to the weather. The amber weather warning meant I had no choice but to stay overnight at our Casualty Centre to deal with any incidents and to ensure that if volunteers couldn’t get to the centre in the morning I would be there already to cover and ensure they were cleaned and fed. It was a very rough night including shooting out to search for a badger road casualty at Nutley, unfortunately the finder didn’t wait with the badger, so when we arrived the badger could not be found, we just hope someone else found it. At about 1am we lost power to the building which didn’t return properly until late the following day. It caused us a few problems with our phone lines, lighting, drainage pumps, and drugs fridge, so we have now invested in a generator which can be used to keep the basic power supply running when this happens again. We have this poorly tawny owl (pictured) in care at the moment which was found in the middle of Friston Forest. A kind lady picked him up and walked back to the car park at Butchers Hole where one of our ambulances met her and delivered him up to our Casualty Centre. He is rather weak and suffering from severe canker. We are treating him at the moment, but as his throat is quite congested so we are having to tube feed him. It is touch and go as to whether he will make it, so we are feeding him little and often and only time will tell. Our ambulances have been busy this week responding to a number of seabirds along the coast. A razorbill was found after it crash landed next to Corsica Hall in Seaford. The bird was not oiled which is when we normally see then, but he was rather disorientated and a bit underweight. Ambulances have also been out to guillemots covered in oil as well as some just underweight and weak at Seaford and Eastbourne. All of these birds have been transported up to the RSPCA Mallydams Wood centre as they have specialist facilities for these types of birds. We are still getting frequent calls to road casualty or collapsed foxes in very severe conditions. One found at Heathfield sadly had to be put to sleep at the vets as did two others found at Ringmer and Eastbourne.