New passive smoking laws to come into effect in October

File photo dated 07/10/08 of a man holding a cigarette while at the wheel of a car in London. Doctors today called for a ban on smoking in all vehicles after a new report revealed passive smoking causes at least 22,000 new cases of asthma and wheezing in children every year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday March 24, 2010. The report from the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) found more than 20,000 chest infections, 120,000 bouts of middle ear disease and 200 cases of meningitis in youngsters are also thought to be linked to the effects of second-hand smoke both inside and outside the home. Furthermore, 40 babies die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDs) every year caused by passive smoking - one in five of all SIDs deaths. See PA story HEALTH Smoking. Photo credit should read: Clive Gee/PA Wire ENGPPP00120120901110232
File photo dated 07/10/08 of a man holding a cigarette while at the wheel of a car in London. Doctors today called for a ban on smoking in all vehicles after a new report revealed passive smoking causes at least 22,000 new cases of asthma and wheezing in children every year. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday March 24, 2010. The report from the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) found more than 20,000 chest infections, 120,000 bouts of middle ear disease and 200 cases of meningitis in youngsters are also thought to be linked to the effects of second-hand smoke both inside and outside the home. Furthermore, 40 babies die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDs) every year caused by passive smoking - one in five of all SIDs deaths. See PA story HEALTH Smoking. Photo credit should read: Clive Gee/PA Wire ENGPPP00120120901110232

Several changes to the law around smoking come into force on October 1.

Several changes to the law around smoking come into force on October 1.

Here is everything you need to know about how the new laws will affect you.

It will be illegal for retailers to sell electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) or e-liquids to someone under 18 and for adults to buy (or try to buy) tobacco products or e-cigarettes for someone under 18.

It will also be illegal to smoke in private vehicles that are carrying someone under 18.

It will be an offence for a person of any age to smoke in a private vehicle that is carrying someone who is under 18 and for a driver (including a provisional driver) not to stop someone smoking in these circumstances.

The rules in vehicles do not apply to e-cigarettes.

The fixed penalty notice fine for both offences is £50. Somebody who commits both offences could get 2 fines. Private vehicles must be carrying more than one person to be smokefree so somebody who is 17 and smoking alone in a private vehicle won’t be committing an offence.

Enforcement officers (usually the police) will use their discretion to decide whether to issue a warning or a fixed penalty notice, or whether to refer an offence to court.

The legislation covers any private vehicle that is enclosed wholly or partly by a roof. A convertible car, or coupe, with the roof completely down and stowed is not enclosed and so isn’t covered by the legislation. But a vehicle with a sunroof open is still enclosed and so is covered by the legislation.

Sitting in the open doorway of an enclosed vehicle is covered by the legislation.

The rules apply to motorhomes, campervans and caravans when they are being used as a vehicle but don’t apply when they are being used as living accommodation.

The rules don’t apply to boats, ships and aircraft, as they have their own rules, and work vehicles and public transport, as they are already covered by smokefree legislation.

The Government introduced the new rules back in July and the take force from October 1.

The Government says the reason for introducing the new legislation was because: “Every time a child breathes in secondhand smoke, they breathe in thousands of chemicals.

“ This puts them at risk of serious conditions, such as meningitis, cancer and respiratory infections such as bronchitis and pneumonia. It can also make asthma worse.

“Secondhand smoke is dangerous for anyone, but children are especially vulnerable, because they breathe more rapidly and have less developed airways, lungs and immune systems. Over 80% of cigarette smoke is invisible and opening windows does not remove its harmful effect.

“The law is changing to protect children and young people from such harm.”

Public Health Minister Jane Ellison said: Three million children are exposed to secondhand smoke in cars, putting their health at risk. We know that many of them feel embarrassed or frightened to ask adults to stop smoking which is why the regulations are important.

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