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Top design award for Eastbourne’s hospice

St Wilfrids Hospice receives Sussex Heritage Award. Arnold Simanowitz and Trust President Rt Hon Lord Egremont DL SUS-140715-112709001

St Wilfrids Hospice receives Sussex Heritage Award. Arnold Simanowitz and Trust President Rt Hon Lord Egremont DL SUS-140715-112709001

St Wilfrid’s Hospice has won a prestigious award from the Sussex Heritage Trust for its new building on Broadwater Way.

The building, designed by architects RHP and completed last August, was recognised by the Trust for the quality and innovation of its design.

Presenting the award to hospice chairman, Arnold Simanowitz, judges said, “This is a brave and definitely successful attempt at creating 21st century hospice care that will serve the community far into the future.”

The hospice cares for more than 1,000 people living with a life limiting illness every year, and since moving, has been able to treat many more patients in its Wellbeing facilities.

It also continues to support more people through its Hospice at Home services.

Chief executive Kara Bishop, said, “We are so delighted to have won the Sussex Heritage Trust award.

“There are so many amazing, inspirational and uplifting things that happen in this lovely building.

“We are profoundly grateful to all our generous and loyal supporters who not only enabled us to build this hospice but who day after day help to support the £11,000 a day it costs to provide free hospice care to over a thousand local people each year.

At the heart of its design is a cafe open to the public where it holds many musical and art events, to attract people from the community into the building.

Kara Bishop added, “We hope many more people will come and see the building for themselves by popping into our café which is open every day!”

St Wilfrid’s Hospice is a registered charity serving a population of 235,000 from Eastbourne, Polegate, Pevensey, Seaford, Hailsham, Heathield, Uckfield and everywhere between, providing skilled and compassionate care for patients with complex needs nearing the end of life.

 

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