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Pupils prepare for Bronze Age Festival

Pupils and staff from West Rise School along with environmental and archaeological experts give the thumbs up to the Bronze Age! SUS-140722-124715001

Pupils and staff from West Rise School along with environmental and archaeological experts give the thumbs up to the Bronze Age! SUS-140722-124715001

A Bronze Age Festival – showcasing the culmination of six months of archaeological investigation – will take place at Shinewater Fun Day on September 6.

Causeway, Langney, Shinewater and West Rise Schools have all been working alongside archaeologists and specialists using funding agreed by Langney councillors from Eastbourne Borough Council’s devolved budget scheme.

Each school will present their work at the festival, which will include demonstrations of bronze smelting, prehistoric cooking and hunting skills as well as the results of their scientific study of the marshland environment.

The school project is being managed by local archaeologist Annalie Seaman on behalf of the Friends of Shinewater, supported by Eastbourne Borough Council.

Councillor Alan Shuttleworth, chair of the Fun Day, said, “This year’s Fun Day will be a spectacular affair.

“Langney schools are all participating in a fascinating project to raise awareness of the Bronze Age Heritage of Shinewater Park.”

The original Bronze Age site is now largely underwater or deep under the ground of Shinewater Park and is protected as a Scheduled Ancient Monument, but the finds that were made in 1995 were truly staggering.

Perfectly preserved timbers 3,000-years-old stretched across the marsh in some form of causeway and an area known as ‘The Platform’ contained hearths and hundreds of finds from pottery to fine bronze axes and included the famous Shinewater Sickle, now on display in the British Museum.

The sickle was also the inspiration behind the badge of Causeway School.

Councillor Carolyn Heaps added, “The work from the scheme has focused on the incredible Bronze Age Heritage of the area and the pupils have been immersing themselves in what it may have been like to live on the marsh more than 3,000 years ago.”

The project has attempted to fire the imaginations of the children and inspire them to find out more about where they live .

 

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