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Emergency orthopaedic services move out of Eastbourne

Eastbourne DGH District General Hospital . January 3rd 2013 E0103Q ENGSUS00120140201135018

Eastbourne DGH District General Hospital . January 3rd 2013 E0103Q ENGSUS00120140201135018

Emergency and high risk orthopaedic services at Eastbourne’s DGH have been moved to the Conquest Hospital today (Tuesday May 13)

East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust said the majority of patients requiring these services are either taken to hospital by ambulance or referred by their GP, so members of the public should not change the way they access health services as a result of this move.

The spokesperson added, “The decision to centralise emergency and high risk orthopaedics was made following a public consultation held during 2012 and will improve the quality of care that the Trust is able to offer to patients.

“The vast majority of patients who use the Trust’s services will not notice any difference as the majority of planned operations and procedures, day case surgery, outpatient clinics, diagnostic tests and admissions for all other medical conditions will continue to be provided at both Eastbourne DGH and Conquest Hospital as before.

“The move will mean a small number of more complex planned (elective) orthopaedic operations will now take place at Conquest Hospital rather than Eastbourne DGH; those patients affected will be notified individually.”

Dr Andy Slater, Medical Director (Strategy), added, “As doctors working in East Sussex we are committed to improving the healthcare available for our communities.

“We firmly believe the changes to emergency and high risk orthopaedics will improve the quality of care we are able to provide to patients now and in the future in East Sussex.

“By having all emergency and high risk orthopaedics based on one site, we now have more surgeons available to carry out planned procedures and an on-call surgeon to deal with any patients needing emergency care.

“This means we will be able to reduce the number of planned operations that we have to cancel and treat people more quickly, which in turn will improve their recovery.”

 

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