Green light is given for park improvements

Princes Park, Royal Parade, Channel View Road entrance January 4th 2013 E02077P ENGSUS00120131001163942
Princes Park, Royal Parade, Channel View Road entrance January 4th 2013 E02077P ENGSUS00120131001163942

A new look cafe and a pedestrian link to the seafront are just some of the improvements planned for Princes Park over the next couple of years.

The facelift – dependent on funding from the government’s Coastal Communities Fund – will also see a new entrance to the park and the redundant bowling greens will be removed to make way for a new public space.

Councillors recently granted planning permission for the extensive improvements which are estimated to cost in the region of £1.8 million.

A spokesperson at Eastbourne Borough Council said, “The planning committee approved plans to create a new entrance to the park and the provision of a new pedestrian link with ramped access between the park and the promenade.

“The redundant bowling greens will also be removed to allow for a new public space and the existing café will undergo extensive remodelling and refurbishment. The project is part of a larger series of improvements to Devonshire Ward and is dependent on an application to the Coastal Communities Fund for £1.8m.”

Steve Wallis, chair of the Driving Devonshire Forward Steering Group, said, “If we can secure the funding we will be able to deliver a really exciting series of developments that will elevate Princes Park to an even higher level of quality and enjoyment for the many residents and visitors that enjoy using it.”

The park was recently awarded Green Flag status for the fourth consecutive year. It is believed the proposed park enhancements will support the council’s ambition of maintaining this prestigious recognition in the years to come.

Princes Park is 33 acres which includes the boating lake and the Oval football ground. Originally called Gilbert’s Recreation Ground, after the owner, it was leased to Eastbourne council in 1907. In 1931, King Edward VIII, then the Prince of Wales, visited the park and planted an Evergreen Oak and the park was shortly renamed Princes Park in his honour.