Filching Quarry landfill proposal: ‘Road can’t cope’ with quarry plans

Stephen Lloyd at the meeting to protest against the pans

Stephen Lloyd at the meeting to protest against the pans

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LETTERS of objection to a monumental landfill proposal have breached the 100 mark after another protest meeting.

Eastbourne and Willingdon MP Stephen Lloyd lent his weight to Filching Landfill Action Group’s (FLAG) campaign against plans to fill in the disused Filching Quarry near Filching Manor at the meeting last Friday (May 13).

Waste management and recycling company Haulaway plans to dump 680,000 tons of inert landfill material into the derelict chalk pit over five year.

But residents say it would turn their quiet hamlet into a dusty, dangerous highway for heavy goods vehicles.

Managing director of Hailsham-based Haulaway, Colin Holloway, has said the quarry needs to be filled in for safety reasons. But campaigners reject the claim, saying it is a money-making scheme worth £7.5 million.

FLAG wildlife co-ordinator Iain Taylor said, “Cyclists, horse riders and walkers will become slow-moving roadblocks for the traffic as it moves up and down.

“It would be only a matter of time before there is a serious or fatal accident.

“We think that the full worth of this application is about £7.5 million at today’s price.

“This is about an exercise in wealth.”

More than 70 people mustered to hear how best to register their objections to the plans with East Sussex County Council. Jasmine Gayton, of FLAG, said since the meeting they had received about six letters of objection a day to FLAG’s website.

She hopes 200 residents will have registered their concerns by the end of the public consultation period next Friday (May 27).

At the meeting Mr Lloyd said, “It’s just complete lunacy and a nonsense, the road won’t cope with it.”

Campaigners believe the rural, winding road will collapse under the weight of 52 journeys five days a week by 32-ton lorries.

The county council will consider the application, but it will be South Downs National Park’s planning committee which has the final say.