Busiest night ever for Sussex animal rescuers

SUS-151106-071859001
SUS-151106-071859001
0
Have your say

Volunteer rescuers from East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service had their busiest evening of rescues ever in their history.

Between 6pm and midnight yesterday (Wednesday), their rescue line received more than 35 calls, resulting in 14 casualties needing rescuing and admitting for care.

Sussex animal rescues SUS-151106-071935001

Sussex animal rescues SUS-151106-071935001

The calls included a window strike jackdaw in Eastbourne, a grounded jackdaw in Hamsey Crescent in Lewes, a road casualty blackbird from Micklefield Way in Seaford, an injured sparrow from South Street, Lewes, a wren with an injured leg from Bodle Street Green, a collapsed wood pigeon from Hurst Road, Eastbourne, which was a possible road casualty, a young crow with vitamin deficiencies from Old Orchard Road, Eastbourne, a hedgehog out during day light in South Chailey, a hedgehog out during day light with a head tilt in Motcombe Road, Eastbourne, a hedgehog out during day light in Barcombe, a very chesty hedgehog from Upper Sherwood Road, Seaford, and a road casualty fox cub on the A259 at Newhaven.

Volunteers Chris Riddington, Trevor Weeks, Daryl Farmer, Kirsti Sibbald, Tony Neads, Andrew Loftus and Charlotte Humphrey said they worked hard to cover all the calls as well as answer the phones and deal with admissions including emergency first aid and treatment at WRAS’s Casualty Centre at Whitesmith.

WRAS rescuers finally finish and returned home at 1am.

“Its is very exhausting at this time of year as we are constantly losing sleep, and you struggling to find time to recuperate, so it builds up,” said Trevor.

SUS-151106-071911001

SUS-151106-071911001

“There are days when you don’t even get a chance to stop and eat anything. Even if we are not out on rescues or treating casualties, we have the paperwork to deal with which comes with each casualty.

“It really varies from day to day too, so it is really difficult to plan for the busy days.”

Trevor said the increase in casualties always occurs at this time of year.

“This is the highest number of calls and casualties we have had to deal with in an evening before,” he said.

SUS-151106-071922001

SUS-151106-071922001

“We had to draft in additional volunteers to help deal with the workload meaning duty manager Chris Riddington and I ended up working more than 17 hours each.

“We believe the unusually cold nights is not helping many of the young wildlife we are having to admit.”

WRAS receives up to 110 phone calls a day during the busy period.

WRAS now has 184 casualties in care either at its casualty centre at Whitesmith or at a variety of outdoor pens round the county including three rodents, nine starlings, three collared doves, one rabbit, 13 hedgehogs, feral pigeons and crows, tawny owls and squirrels.

SUS-151106-071846001

SUS-151106-071846001

To donate to WRAS visit www.wildlifeambulance.org

* Here are four ways you can be sure you’ll be amongst the first to know what’s going on.

1 Make our website your homepage at www.eastbourneherald.co.uk

2 Like our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ Eastbourne-Herald-and-Gazette

3 Follow us on Twitter @Eastbournenews

4 Register with us by clicking on ‘sign in’ (top right corner). You can then receive our daily newsletter AND add your point of view to stories that you read here.