Bereaved mum to hold fundraising 60s disco in Seaford

A MOTHER who lost her son to a rare form of cancer is holding a fundraising 60s disco in Seaford next month.

Gill Pilcher is hoping the event, which will take place at the Constitutional Club on Saturday September 18, will be a great success.

Her son Anthony, who had lived in Peacehaven all his life, died from the bone cancer osteosarcoma when he was 15.

All money raised from the 60s disco will go towards the Bone Cancer Research Trust which has funded 18 research projects in the last four years.

Following Anthony's diagnosis the teenager wanted to raise money for research in the hope that he might be able to save other people going through what he was going to have to endure.

As soon as he started chemotherapy, he asked people to sponsor him to have his head shaved. His friends at the Lewes Old Grammar School wanted to do their bit to help and arranged a rock concert under the name of Fish Aid, as Anthony's nickname was Fish.

In December 2001 Anthony handed over a cheque for 3,000 to Cancer Research, which had been raised from the head shave and other fundraising events.

Following the Peacehaven resident's death in October 2002 the Anthony Pilcher Bone Cancer Trust was set up and Fish Aid is an important part of the charity.

The charity has linked up with the Bone Cancer Research Trust and all money raised goes to the organisation.

Gill is hopeful that the September event will help to boost the charity pot and raise awareness of the disease.

Gill said, "Our main thing is getting information out there that these things are around and it does affect children but because it's rare it doesn't get picked up very quickly. And with all cancers the quicker you pick it up the better.

"It's a very rare cancer, there's about 400 new cases each year but because of that it doesn't get funding from anyone else. We (Bone Cancer Research Trust) are the only charity that actually carries out research at this time."

To book tickets for the 60s disco or to find out more please visit the website: www.apbct.org.uk or call 01273 808874.